Beatles, the
Revolver =2009 remastred=

  1 x LP   180grs   33⅓rpm     STEREO Remastered from Original AnalogueTaper= 

2012 repressing 2009 EU Remastered from original STEREO master tapes on 180gr vinyl= When the dust settles amidst critical debates, fewer than ten albums compete for the title of the Best Album Ever Recorded. Revolver is one of the chosen few—and for goo

Label:  EMI 
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Release date: 08-11-2012(Originally released in 1966)

2012 EU=2009 Remastered from orginal STEREO master tapes on 180gr vinyl= When the dust settles amidst critical debates, fewer than ten albums compete for the title of the Best Album Ever Recorded. Revolver is one of the chosen few—and for good reason. Seemingly reflecting the music of the Beatles' biggest peers of the time but surpassing it all by leaps and bounds, Revolver overturned conceptions of what music was and could be. Without any doubt, Revolver altered how every band from then on made records. And as this pressing proves, it still does. =Cut at Abbey Road Studios by a First-Rate Team of Producers and Engineers: Stringent Procedures and Safeguards Ensure Optimum Audiophile-Quality Sound

Part of Capitol/Apple’s quintessential Beatles catalog masters series on LP, Revolver has been remastered by a dedicated team of engineers that includes Guy Massey, Steve Rooke, and Sam Okell with Paul Hicks and Sean Magee. Proper care and a painstaking series of steps were taken to ensure that music lovers would hear the Fab Four in all their glory with unprecedented clarity and transparency.

Tracks:
A1.  Taxman
A2.  Eleanor Rigby
A3.  I'm Only Sleeping
A4.  Love You To
A5.  Here, There And Everywhere
A6.  Yellow Submarine
A7.  She Said She Said

B1.  Good Day Sunshine
B2.  And Your Bird Can Sing
B3. For No One
B4. Doctor Robert
B5. I Want To Tell You
B6. Got To Get You Into My Life
B7. Tomorrow Never Knows 


"I don't see too much difference between Revolver and Rubber Soul," George Harrison once said. "To me, they could be Volume One and Volume Two." Revolver extends the more adventurous aspects of its predecessor – its introspection, its nascent psychedelia, its fascination with studio artistry – into a dramatic statement of generational possibility.

The album, which was released in August 1966, made it thrillingly clear that what we now think of as "the Sixties" was fully – and irreversibly – under way.

The most innovative track on the album is John Lennon's "Tomorrow Never Knows." Attempting to distill an LSD trip into a three-minute song, Lennon borrowed lyrics from Timothy Leary's version of The Tibetan Book of the Dead, and recorded his vocal to sound like "the Dalai Lama singing from the highest mountaintop." Tape loops, a backward guitar part (Paul McCartney's blistering solo on "Taxman," in fact) and a droning tamboura completed the experimental effect, and the song proved hugely influential. For his part, on "Eleanor Rigby" and "For No One," McCartney mastered a strikingly mature form of art song, and Harrison, with "Taxman," "I Want to Tell You" and "Love You To," challenged Lennon-McCartney's songwriting dominance.

Part of the album's revolutionary impulse was visual. Klaus Voormann, one of the Beatles' artist buddies from their days in Hamburg, Germany, designed a striking photo-collage cover for Revolver; it was a crucial step on the road to the even trippier, more colorful imagery of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which would come less than a year later.

Revolver signaled that in popular music, anything – any theme, any musical idea – could now be realized. And, in the case of the Beatles, would be.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/500-greatest-albums-of-all-time-20120531/the-beatles-revolver-20120524#ixzz368aZmV59
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Recorded before the Beatles’ personalities began to clash and in advance of the fog brought on by drug use, Revolver encompasses practically every imaginable style and then some. Gentle harmonic pop (“I Want to Tell You”), stained-glass acid rock (“She Said She Said”), upbeat soul (“Got to Get You Into My Life”), Indian (“Love You To”), and what, at the time, and in some ways still is, the most cutting-edge pop composition ever devised (“Tomorrow Never Knows”), a song that single-handedly reimagined and rewrote the rules of production.

Best yet, the Beatles sound cohesive, enthusiastic, and confident. There are no fractures in the chemistry, and the band amicably competes with itself in aiming for and achieving rock immortality. With George Emerick in the fold as the new engineer, the Beatles approached the studio as a chemistry lab. The biggest revelation? The potential of tape loops, as evidenced by “Tomorrow Never Knows,” where phasing, reversing, slowing, and sampling turned the composition into a piece of masterpiece theater. Ringo’s bass drum is also noticeably tighter, thanks to the addition of a sweater placed inside. All of the aspects are fully audible and amazingly preserved on this mind-blowing LP pressing.
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With EMI’s legendary Abbey Road Studios providing the backdrop, the four-year restoration process combined veteran expertise, state-of-the-art equipment, vintage studio gear, and rigorous testing to net what is without doubt the highest fidelity possible and authentic, jaw-dropping sound guaranteed to rival the original LPs. There is no longer any need to pay hundreds of dollars for Japanese pressings.

At the start of the restoration process, engineers conducted extensive tests before copying the analog master tapes into the digital realm using 24-bit/192 kHz resolution and a Prism A-D converter. Dust build-ups were removed from tape machine heads after the completion of each title. Artifacts such as electrical clicks, microphone vocal pops, excessive sibilance, and poor edits were improved upon as long as it was determined that doing so didn’t at all damage the integrity of the songs. Similarly, de-noising technology was applied in only a few necessary spots and on a sum total of less than five of the entire 525 minutes of Beatles music.

In cutting the digital masters to vinyl, stringent safeguards and procedures were employed. After cutting to lacquer, determined to be warmer and consistent than cutting to DMM, the next step was to use the Neumann VMS80 cutting lathe at Abbey Road. Following thorough mechanical and electrical tests to ensure it was operating in peak condition, engineer Sean Magee cut the LPs in chronological release order. He used the original 24-bit remasters rather than the 16-bit versions that were required for CD production. It was also decided to use the remasters that had not undergone ‘limiting,' a procedure to increase the sound level.
 
Having made initial test cuts, Magee pinpointed any sound problems that can occur during playback of vinyl records. To rectify them, changes were made to the remasters with a Digital Audio Workstation.  For example, each vinyl album was listened to for any ‘sibilant episodes.' vocal distortion that can occur on consonant sounds such as S and T. These were corrected by reducing the level in the very small portion of sound causing the undesired effect.

Similarly, any likelihood of inner-groove distortion was addressed. As the stylus approaches the center of the record, it is liable to track the groove less accurately. This can affect the high-middle frequencies, producing a ‘mushy’ sound particularly noticeable on vocals. Using what Magee has described as ‘surgical EQ,’ problem frequencies were identified and reduced in level to compensate for this.
 
The last phase of the vinyl mastering process began with the arrival of the first batches of test pressings made from master lacquers that had been sent to the two pressing plant factories. Stringent quality tests identified any noise or click appearing on more than one test pressing in the same place. If this happened, it was clear that the undesired sounds had been introduced either during the cutting or the pressing stage and so the test records were rejected. In the quest to achieve the highest quality possible, the Abbey Road team worked closely with the pressing factories and the manufacturers of the lacquer and cutting styli.

For this project, there was no such thing as too many cooks in the kitchen. Yes, it took a village to get it right.

Discs: 1
Drager(LP,EP,12,7,CD): LP
Qual(120grs,150grs,180grs): 180grs
Speed(33,45): 33
Extra info: STEREO Remastered from Original AnalogueTaper=
Label: EMI
Originally released: 1966
This release: 2012
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