Billie Holiday
Commodore Days

  1 x LP   180grs   33⅓rpm   

(originally recorded in 1939-44)-2014 EU reissue Vinyl LP edition, pressed on 140gram VIRGIN VINYL=The "Strange Fruit" session for Commodore, was one of those historic moments and part of Holiday's legend hinges on the tr...

Label:  DOL 
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Release date 30-01-2014(originally recorded in 1939-44)

2014 EU reissue Vinyl LP edition, pressed on 140gram VIRGIN VINYL=The "Strange Fruit" session for Commodore, was one of those historic moments and part of Holiday's legend hinges on the tremendous courage it took for her go ahead and record this song, knowing that it might well mean the end of her career. Three other songs, found here, were also recorded at that session: "Yesterdays," "Fine And Mellow" and "I Gotta Right To Sing the Blues," while due to contractual issues, the remaining Commodore sides were not recorded until five years later in 1944.

Tracks:
A1. Strange Fruits
A2. Yesterdays
A3. Fine & Mellow
A4. I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues
A5. How Am I To Know
A6. My Old Flame
A7. I'll Get By
A8. I Cover The Waterfront

B1. I'll Be Seeing You
B2. I'm Yours
B3. Embraceable You
B4. As Time Goes By
B5. He's Funny That Way
B6. Lover, Come Back To Me
B7. Billie's Blues
B8. On The Sunny Of The Street

In 1939 when Billie Holiday's label refused to record the highly controversial "Strange Fruit," she did not give up, but searched desperately for a label that was not afraid to take a risk. Thankfully Milt Gabler at Commodore Records, a fledgling independent jazz label, understood the importance of this song being recorded and released to the public and soon arranged for Holiday to record a session with him.

A Lady Day collection featuring four songs recorded in 1939 and twelve from three separate sessions in 1944. "Billie Holiday has often been popularly labeled a blues singer, but she was never that, within the generally accepted definition. The overwhelming majority of her records are of popular songs, Tin Pan Alley trifles, which she elevates by her immense talent into significant jazz performances. It could be said that Bessie Smith brought the blues to the popular song, while Billie Holiday took the popular song to the blues. Her whole checkered life, sometimes intensely gay, often abysmally tragic, always defiant, imbued her with the true spirit of the blues. However banal the lyric or trite the tune, this spirit became the catalyst by which they were transmuted into blues . . . Little need be said of the performances themselves. Place the disc on your turntable; sit back and listen to old tunes that become new in Billie's hands; commonplace ballads that become unique." - Ian Jennings (from the original liner notes)

Discs: 1
Drager(LP,EP,12,7,CD): LP
Qual(120grs,150grs,180grs): 180grs
Speed(33,45): 33
Label: DOL
This release: 2014
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