Paul Desmond
Take Ten

  1 x LP   180grs   33⅓rpm     Cut and Mastered by Bernie Grundman at Pallus / Limited Edition of 1500 Numbered Copies 

2005 German Speakers Corner remastered using pure analogue components on 180g virgin vinyl-"There is not a single track here that isn't loaded with ingeniously worked out, always melodic idea"allmusic, with old favourites "Alone Together", "Nancy" and "Th

Label:  ORG music Group 
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Release date: 19-10-2005(originally released in 1963)

2005 German Speakers Corner remastered using pure analogue components on 180g virgin vinyl- No, not "Take Five" but "Take Ten" is the title of this LP and its very first number. Certainly this should be taken as a hint that it was not Dave Brubeck but Paul Desmond who was the composer of this 'million seller'. At the recording session, the guitarist Jim Hall was more than a substitute for the piano - he contributed to the quartet a whole new sound colouring which was tinged with the influences of bossa nova.

The numbers are all easy-going and airy, the melodic lines and sound are filled with transparency. All the while one is curious as to the clear part-writing, and the wealth of ideas emanating from the soloists. This does not only apply to the old favourites "Alone Together", "Nancy" and "The One I Love", all three of them arrangements made ad hoc in the studio and which demonstrate how familiar the musicians were with one another, how they listened to one another, answered, and kept the dialogue flowing. The atmosphere is relaxed, and this conveys itself to the listener even after almost half a century.
RCA’s recording and reproduction technology was ahead of its time. The music of these South-American-sounding gems comes out of the loudspeakers with brilliance, clarity and - at last - without the frustrating crackle of a second-hand LP.

This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. More information under http://www.pure-analogue.com. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.
Recording: 1963 in Webster Hall, New York, by Ray Hall
Production: George Avakian

Tracks:
A1 Take Ten
A2 El Prince
A3 Alone Together
A4 Embarcadero
B1 Theme From "Black Orpheus"
B2 Nancy
B3 Samba De Orfeu
B4 The One I Love (Belongs To Somebody Else)

Ratings:
Allmusic: Discogs: 4,54 / 5
Rate Your Music: 3,74 / 5

Credits:
Alto Saxophone – Paul Desmond
Bass – Gene Wright* (tracks: A1), Gene Cherico (tracks: A2 to B3)
Drums – Connie Kay
Guitar – Jim Hall

When Paul Desmond wanted to create a sequel to the touchstone jazz number “Take Five,” he did just that with the appropriately titled "Take Ten." The title tune from this 1963 recording is a reworking of the classic "Take Five" theme in 10/8 time. Certainly, this should be taken as a hint that it was not Dave Brubeck but Desmond who was the composer of the best selling jazz single of all time.

Paul Desmond and Jim Hall’s collaboration on this quartet project stands as one of the finest recordings either ever produced. Each artist is allowed plenty of breathing room on their respective instrument with their counterpart offering a touch or a texture here and there as the perfect complement. The atmosphere here is rich and relaxed, and this conveys itself to the listener in spades even after half a century.

Now Paul Desmond's Take Ten finally gets the audiophile treatment it deserves, with this 180 gram vinyl reissue mastered from original analog tapes by Bernie Grundman. Each copy of this limited edition release is numbered with a gold foil stamp. Limited Edition of 1500 Numbered Copies

 

Musicians:
Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)
Jim Hall (guitar)
Gene Cherico / Gene Wright (bass)
Connie Kay (drums)

No, not Take Five but Take Ten is the title of this LP and its very first number. Certainly this should be taken as a hint that it was not Dave Brubeck but Paul Desmond who was the composer of this 'million seller'. At the recording session, the guitarist Jim Hall was more than a substitute for the piano - he contributed to the quartet a whole new sound coloring which was tinged with the influences of bossa nova.

The numbers are all easy-going and airy, the melodic lines and sound are filled with transparency. All the while one is curious as to the clear part-writing, and the wealth of ideas emanating from the soloists. This does not only apply to the old favorites "Alone Together", "Nancy" and "The One I Love," all three of them arrangements made ad hoc in the studio and which demonstrate how familiar the musicians were with one another, how they listened to one another, answered, and kept the dialogue flowing.

The atmosphere is relaxed, and this conveys itself to the listener even after almost half a century. RCA’s recording and reproduction technology was ahead of its time and the music of these South-American-sounding gems comes out of the loudspeakers with brilliance, clarity and - at last - without the frustrating crackle of a second-hand LP.


ALLMUSICGUIDE:
Now listeners enter the heart of the Paul Desmond/Jim Hall sessions, a great quartet date with Gene Cherico manning the bass (Gene Wright deputizes on the title track) and MJQ drummer Connie Kay displaying other sides of his personality. Everyone wanted Desmond to come up with a sequel to the monster hit "Take Five"; and so he did, reworking the tune and playfully designating the meter as 10/8. Hence "Take Ten," a worthy sequel with a solo that has a Middle-Eastern feeling akin to Desmond's famous extemporaneous excursion with Brubeck in "Le Souk" back in 1954. It was here that Desmond also unveiled a spin-off of the then-red-hot bossa nova groove that he called "bossa antigua" (a sardonic play-on-words meaning "old thing"), which laid the ground for Desmond's next album and a few more later in the decade. Two of the best examples are his own tunes, the samba-like "El Prince" (named after arranger Bob Prince), an infectious number with on-the-wing solo flights that you can't get out of your head, and the haunting "Embarcadero." Hall now gets plenty of room to stretch out, supported by Kay's gently dropped bombs, and he is the perfect understated swinging foil for the wistful altoist. There is not a single track here that isn't loaded with ingeniously worked out, always melodic ideas.

Discs: 1
Drager(LP,EP,12,7,CD): LP
Qual(120grs,150grs,180grs): 180grs
Speed(33,45): 33
Extra info: Cut and Mastered by Bernie Grundman at Pallus / Limited Edition of 1500 Numbered Copies
Label: ORG music Group
Originally released: 1962
This release: 2014
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