Erroll Garner
Ready Take One

  1 x LP   Standard   33⅓rpm   

2016 EU issue on 180g 2LP = Now, after 25 years, we have Erroll Garner: Ready Take One—a newly issued 14-song album of previously unreleased material recorded between 1967 and 1971 with fairly consistent bassists and drummers behind him.

Label:  Savoy Records 
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Release date: 30-11-2016

2016 EU issue on 180g 2LP = Now, after 25 years, we have Erroll Garner: Ready Take One—a newly issued 14-song album of previously unreleased material recorded between 1967 and 1971 with fairly consistent bassists and drummers behind him.

Tracks:
LP1:
A1 High Wire
A2 I Want To Be Happy
A3 I'm Confessin' (That I Love You)
A4 Sunny

B1 Wild Music
B2 Caravan
B3 Back To You

LP2:
C1 Night And Day
C2 Chase Me
C3 Satin Doll
C4 Latin Digs

D1 Stella By Starlight
D2 Down Wylie Avenue
D3 Misty

When Erroll Garner died in 1977, Martha Glaser, his long-time manager and the executor of his estate, refused to allow the pianist's unreleased Columbia material to be issued by the label. The long-running dispute dated back to 1960, when Glaser decided her client wasn't earning an appropriate sum based on the reach of his talent and sales of his albums. She sued the label and was tireless in her defense and support of Garner's business interests.
When Glaser died in 2014, the executors of her estate became the executor of Garner's estate as well. Last year, the Glaser estate's executor began to selectively authorize the release of Garner's unissued Columbia material, though some might argue that the gears on this conveyor belt have been turning way too slowly. The first release to achieve the estate's approval was the Complete Concert By the Sea, which proved to be a masterpiece and, deservedly, won a Grammy.

Now, we have Erroll Garner: Ready Take One—a newly issued 14-song album of previously unreleased material recorded between 1967 and 1971 with fairly consistent bassists and drummers behind him. To be honest, I have mixed feelings about the new material. On the one hand, it's gratifying to hear previously unheard Garner, no matter how or where it was recorded. On the other hand, much of the material here feels half-baked and unfocused. Missing is the wound-tight energy and puckish humor so dominant in Garner's earlier recordings.


It's not clear why Garner sounded short of his old self. Perhaps it was just the aging process. Or perhaps Glaser's capabilities and experience as a producer were a bit limited and was unable to set a high bar. For example, I'm Confessin' (That I Love You) comes off sluggish and seems aimless in places. A better producer would have had Garner pick up the pace on another take. Sunny also lacks the usual Garner snap. High Wire is an attempt at soul-jazz, which was popular during the period. But it, too, is missing the funky feel this form relied on. Instead, we have Garner pounding away with his left hand, overshadowing the right.
The Garner of old starts to emerge on Back to You, building lush tension and consistently applying crisp elegance. However, the Night and Day that follows is, again, a bit of an aimless snore.

 

Discs: 1
Drager(LP,EP,12,7,CD): LP
Qual(120grs,150grs,180grs): Standard
Speed(33,45): 33
Label: Savoy Records
Originally released: 1949
This release: 2013
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